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dc.contributor.authorWintersberger, Philippde_DE
dc.contributor.authorRiener, Andreasde_DE
dc.contributor.editorZiegler, Jürgende_DE
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-20T08:43:36Z
dc.date.available2017-11-20T08:43:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2196-6826de_DE
dc.identifier.urihttp://dl.gi.de/handle/20.500.12116/6124
dc.description.abstractTrust in technology is an important factor to be considered for safety-critical systems. Of particular interest today is the transport domain, as more and more complex information and assistance systems find their way into vehicles. Research in driving automation / automated driving systems is in the focus of many research institutes worldwide. On the operational side, active safety systems employed to save lives are frequently used by non-professional drivers that neither know system boundaries nor the underlying functional principle. This is a serious safety issue, as systems are activated under false circumstances and with wrong expectations. At least some of the recent incidents with advanced driving assistance systems (ADAS) or automated driving systems (ADS; SAE J3016) could have been prevented with a full understanding of the driver about system functionality and limitations (instead of overreliance). Drivers have to be trained to accept and use these systems in a way, that subjective trust matches objective trustworthiness (cf. “appropriate trust”) to prevent disuse and / or misuse. In this article, we present an interaction model for trust calibration that issues personalized messages in real time. On the showcase of automated driving we report the results of two user studies related to trust in ADS and driving ethics. In the first experiment (N = 48), mental and emotional states of front-seat passengers were compared to get deeper insight into the dispositional trust of potential users of automated vehicles. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, we found that subjects accept and trust ADSs almost similarly as male / female drivers. In another study (N = 40), moral decisions of drivers were investigated in a systematic way. Our results indicate that the willingness of drivers to risk even severe accidents increases with the number and age of pedestrians that would otherwise be sacrificed. Based on our initial findings, we further discuss related aspects of trust in driving automation. Effective shared vehicle control and expected advantages of fully / highly automated driving (SAE levels 3 or higher) can only be achieved when trust issues are demonstrated and resolved.de_DE
dc.publisherDe Gruyterde_DE
dc.relation.ispartofi-com: Vol. 15, No. 3de_DE
dc.subjectAutomated Vehiclesde_DE
dc.subjectTrust Calibrationde_DE
dc.subjectUser Acceptancede_DE
dc.subjectEthical Decision Makingde_DE
dc.subjectSAE J3016de_DE
dc.titleTrust in Technology as a Safety Aspect in Highly Automated Drivingde_DE
dc.typeresearch-articlede_DE
dc.pubPlaceBerlinde_DE
mci.document.qualitydigidocde_DE
mci.reference.pages297de_DE
gi.identifier.doi10.1515/icom-2016-0034


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